Big Love for Tiny Owl Knits

In our entire store, THREE of our top ten knitting patterns have been written by Stephanie Dosen of Tiny Owl Knits. It’s easy to see why. Tiny Owl Knits patterns are beautiful, original and easy to follow. The levels of skills required varies, and this is indicated on each pattern. All of the following patterns are available from our online store, just click on the picture for a link.

Our top selling Tiny Owl Knits patterns are:

ImageThe Hopsalot Slippers by Tiny Owl Knits

 

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The Beekeeper’s Quilt by Tiny Owl Knits

Tiny Owl Knits knitting patterns are all designed by Stephanie Dosen, a singer from America, who has a penchant for magical creatures and whimsical designs. At The Knit Club, we love how Tiny Owl Knit patterns take you out of the real world and on a mini adventure! 

The Hopsalot slippers are knitted and felted with a chunky, undyed yarn. You can make them in different sizes, for big or little feet! The details are adorable, from the cute folded ears to the little pom-pom tail.

The Beekeeper’s Quilt is a perfect stash-buster project. The quilt is made from lots of “hexipuffs”, which are hexagonal stuffed knitted pockets which you eventually sew together to make a tessellated, textured blanket. You can use any colours you like, in sock weight yarn (for a totally beautiful blanket – we’d recommend Rowan Fine Art Sock Yarn – see picture).

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And the third best-selling knitting pattern is:

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Baby Lamb Cuffs by Tiny Owl Knits

If you are new to colour-work knitting, these fingerless mittens are perfect. Practise the intarsia technique and create a very cute baby sheep pattern. One size fits all and they make great presents too! We have knitted them with Rowan’s Felted Tweed, which works perfectly in it’s muted shades and gives a beautiful texture.

Which Tiny Owl Knits pattern is your favourite??

 

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Pom Pom Party!

Last Friday, we hosted our first kid’s craft party at The Knit Club. It was amazing!

Image12 eight year olds were invited to make cool pom pom people at our shop, in honour of a special birthday girl. For the afternoon, we prepped some our our bags and craft materials.The Knit Club

The paper bags were creatively transformed into party bags with colourful felt pens. The artistic talent was very impressive!

The Knit Club Kids Party

We then used Clover Pom Pom makers (super easy to use over and over again) to make large acrylic pom poms.

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The Clover pom pom makers make the process so easy, even for little hands. We used different coloured yarns so that the pom pom people would be multi-coloured. We then added elastic string to dangle them and googly eyes so that they can see!

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The AMAZING birthday cake was also yarn themed!

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The kids were super happy with their new pom pom people, and acquired pom pom making skills!

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To book your party at The Knit Club,

call 01883345220 or visit our website.

Baby Talk…

Last Saturday, we were lucky enough to welcome Erika Knight to The Knit Club for the second time! In timing with the launch of her beautiful ‘knit for baby’ poster pattern. Erika signed copies of her pattern, as well as giving a talk about knitting for babies.

Erika Knight Baby Talk at The Knit Club

 

Here’s some of our picks of Erika’s purls of wisdom…

Baby-Fur-Gilet

(Fur Gilet and Legwarmers from ‘knit for baby’ poster pattern)

On talking about her British Blue DK, Erika explained where her yarn finds its spot amongst the many other baby yarns available. Championing the best of British wool, she has selected the softest sheep wool in petite 25g balls. It’s a luxury yarn, perfect for little projects – or little people! At £3.95 per 25g ball, it’s at the higher end of baby yarns – but the sumptuous colours and super soft texture, as well as the British support, make this yarn seem well worth it.

Erika Knight British Blue Wool 42-Pretty

(Erika’s British Blue DK)

Erika talked about her background and raising her daughter in a design-led world (Erika previously designed for Rowan), “Bella learnt all her colours from the Rowan shade cards. She would call orange ‘mango’! “And on picking the palette for her own yarn, Erika said she went for “colours that work even with your eyes shut. They work together or on their own.” And we’d quite agree! Modern, chic but with a smidgen of cuteness for the little people. And for chunky garments, Erika says “Pick two colours and knit the strands together. Really on trend to make a mix. ”

Erika Knight British Blue DK

 

(Erika’s British Blue DK)

Erika gave a lovely run through of the designs now available in her poster pattern. “Hats, blankets leg warmers are good starters. And also make perfect presents.” Her poster pattern also contains a jumper design and a cardigan design. She joked “that one [jumper] has a pocket for their mobile phone – because babies do have mobiles now”.

Erika Knight 'Knit for Baby' Poster Pattern

(Some items from ‘knit for baby’ poster pattern – excluding bootees)

With any tops, jumpers or pullovers for babies – its “important to have easy opening for neck or you could pull off their ears and find ears all over the place! Buttons or press studs are perfect. If you don’t want to make a button hole, don’t – sometimes you can just shove then through! I love dark grey or cream mother of pearl buttons. They have colours that match everything, all you need. ”

Erika Knight Buttons

When showing the moss stitch short sleeve cardigan from her poster pattern, Erika explained “do it in any stitch you want. Easy. And avoid seams if you can. If you can work out how to knit in the round or as one flat piece, then the garment will be much more comfy for baby.”

Erika Knight 'Knit for Baby' Moss Stitch Cardigan

(Moss Stitch Cardigan from Erika’s ‘knit for baby’ poster pattern)

Teaming her knitted garments with cotton dresses and silks, Erika has a keen eye for detail and beautiful taste in tailored garments. She brought along a little vintage silk dress, which commanded oohs and ahhs from everyone in the shop!

Erika Knight's Vintage Silk Dress

On showing one of her past designs, Erika talked about a red cardigan with hand stitched patterns and pictures stitched onto the knitting. “Personalise things. Scribble embroidery. I copied a wrapping paper pattern for a jumper, very cute.

A cushion is a nice present for a new born – experiment with stitches. Stocking stitch and reverse stocking stitch can be used to create monogrammed squares with baby’s initial.

Erika Knight

The day was such a success, with our knitters leaving feeling everything from nostalgic to inspired and raring to knit! And of course, completely in love with Erika’s yarns and patterns.

Kathryn at The Knit Club

Erika kindly signed some items for her fans, including The Knit Club tote!

Erika Knight at The Knit Club

Lavanya, a regular visitor to The Knit Club, said “It’s nice to knit something when you know the designer has put care into the design and thinks about it from your point of view.”

To see the full range of Erika’s yarns and patterns, you can visit our website or pop in to our shop.

Knitterview: Erika Knight

This month, we invite you to peek into the life of Erika Knight – the brilliant and renowned knitwear designer, author and yarn designer.

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We have been lucky enough to meet Erika at the shop, when she came in to do a book signing and talk last October. And we cannot say, for someone so beyond talented and clever, just how nice she is! With many strings to her bow, she is fascinating to listen to – and we were riveted by her talk about colours and shapes, the stories behind her yarn names (Steve is named after Steve McQueen’s beautiful blue eyes) and the reasoning behind her colour choices (you always have to have a “pop” colour in your palette!).

So we proudly present to you, our second knitterview. Enjoy!

When and how did you learn to knit?

I learnt at art school during my punk years, when holes and ladders didn’t matter and safety pins were de rigeur.

How did your career in knitting begin?

After art school I worked for a textile printing company, but unfortunately I couldn’t afford to carry on doing this job that I loved, so I had to fall back on my hobby. I did half a dozen sketches, trawled them round to local and London boutiques and got an order for one or two, then three and four and so it began…

Who / what is your biggest inspiration?

Anything and everything, I am always inspired by things and people around me.

Do you have a favourite design / pattern of all time?

Yes, a sweater called ‘Antarctic’, named after a collection designed for my label Molto! many years ago to celebrate the life of our British hero, Captain Scott. It was like a hit record for us at the time. It was so simple, and I am considering re-releasing it again for this Autumn…watch this space.

Molto - Erika Knight | The Knit Club

What is the best thing about creating your own yarn range?

Being in control of the fibre quality, colours and knowing the whole process is natural, ethical, sustainable and supporting British sheep and manufacturing.

 Erika Knight British Blue Wool 42-Pretty

Erika Knight British Blue Wool in Pretty

Who do you design for?

I design for myself, things I like and value. I believe there are lots of people like me who want classic, timeless pieces, but with a bit of style.

What do you hope people gain from knitting/ crocheting your patterns?

The end result is a timeless, quality garment, but I hope that they too enjoy the process of working with beautiful and natural fibres and simple designs that work.

If you could be someone else (past or present) for one day, who would you be?

I think it would have to be Coco Chanel – because she was a strong woman, a bit of a rebel, a perfectionist, and a true innovator who really conceived and created ready to wear comfortable clothes for modern stylish women.

Coco Chanel

(Coco Chanel)

What song/s are you listening to at the moment?

I love the British jazz saxophonist Simon Spillett, who I recently saw at a basement gig in Soho.

If you could give one piece of advice/wisdom to knitters and crocheters the world over, what would it be?

Experiment, and don’t be frightened to have a go!

The Knit Club stocks Erika Knight beautiful British yarns and patterns (also available online), and the lovely Erika will be visiting The Knit Club on the 27th April at 2pm to talk about her new baby poster pattern and knitting for babies and beyond.

Lost: One Mojo

Since I started crocheting in May last year, I’ve been going pretty much none stop.  But now, I’ve lost my way a bit.

The reason is not a mystery. We have just left our cosy life in the UK with family, friends and knit clubs for a new one in Belgium where, at the moment, there’s not a lot happening.  With the move, the paperwork, the language change, the boxes that need unpacking, the children that need entertaining (and feeding) and the floor that need endless mopping, I don’t have much headspace for crochet.  How sad! Something that should help me relax is making me feel a bit stressed. Perhaps it a reminder of “home”?

Then there’s the added factor of not knowing entirely where everything is.  I know that the yarn stash is in the spare room and the sewing box is in the cupboard in the lounge but where are my hooks? Where’s my rainbow blanket that’s a work in progress? And where’s the felt I need to complete the baby bunting I’ve been working on?

Think I’d better go and rummage in some boxes!

Claire x

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Why Crochet is Better than Sudoku…

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I’ve never been very goodat sitting still.

Once the children are in bed, dinner’s been had and tidied up after and the TV is on, I get twitchy hands.  I’ve surfed the internet, completed jigsaws and solved a serious quantity of Sudoku puzzles in a bid to keep my hands and mind busy.  In May last year, I decided I need something new. I like learning but what to choose?  Going out in the evenings is difficult so it need to be something to do at home.  A few friends on an internet forum crocheted.  Young people.  People like me.  I liked what they produced but have never considered myself a “crafty” person and didn’t think I’d be much good at it.  Nonetheless, I decided to give it a whirl.

I reserved a book at the library, bought a 3.5mm hook and some double knitting yarn and set to it with my book, advice from crocheting friends and some YouTube tutorials.  It was hard to get started: the yarn needed holding a certain way; the hook had to go in this gap, not that one and the finished swatch was, well, wonky.  But soon I got the hang of it and I was hooked (pun intended!).

What have I got to show for my new crochet habit?  Blankets, hats (lots), toddler jumpers, scarves, snowflakes, apples, pears, a pumpkin, a mug cosy, crab and octopus finger puppets and a fried egg.  Oh, and a cupboard full of yarn and some pretty, shiny hooks!  What have I got to show for my old Sudoku habit?  Completed grids of numbers and an average time of just over 7 minutes on the expert level of my phone app.

People are nice about my crochet.  They show an interest in what I’m doing and what I’ve done.  They touch and examine what I’ve made and say nice things about it.  It makes me smile.  People care and it’s great.

I still do Sudoku from time to time but no one’s bothered when you’ve completed a Sudoku puzzle – not even the REALLY hard one on the very back page!

By Claire